Tag Archives: Yahowshuwa

☩ Fasika (ፋሲካ) ✡ Tins(h)a’e (ትንሣኤ) ☩ = Resurrection

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

Ras Tafari Renaissance writes to give perspective to the Ethiopic Tewahido-Orthodox, celebration of Fasika – ፋሲካ (which by transliteration and translation; corresponds directly to the Hebraic P(F)esach – פסח). In other circles of the Liturgical adherents to the Ethiopian Tewahido-Orthodox Church, the name for this observance, can also be called Be’äl Tinsæy – በዓል ትንሣኤ.  I refrain from using the Western Christendom adherance to the psuedo-equivalent, known as Easter; mainly because at the sheer core of the observance of Easter, stems from Greco-Roman Mythology(Eros, Easter Eggs, Easter Bunny, Greek Mythology etc.), and the origin of the celebration of Fasika, comes from the Hebraic Passover (Pesach/PesaKH‘= פֶּסַח) & Feast of Unleavened Bread (KH’ag/Chag HaMatz’ot – Chag ha-Matzot = חג המצה).

Sh’mura Matz’ot – Rabbinical supervised unleavened bread

Fasika commemorates the Resurrection of CHRIST, though the exact day for celebration can be calculated from a perspective that is only slightly in contrast to the original calculation. Through and through, Fasika assuredly gives a better foundation in the surreal conclusion that is the life of CHRIST.

– Ethiopian baked bread (Injera)

Fasika is an extremely climatic celebration, like the Roman Catholic Church fasting season(often called “Lent”), but predating it by hundreds of years, the Ethiopian Tewahido-Orthodox Church adherents go into a fasting, and prayer period consisting of about approx., 40-to-56 days. This important and soul-searching, period of time is known to the adherents as Hudâdæ – ሑዳዴ, or Abiy’ Ts’ome – ዓቢይ ጾመ.

[The Church, in her earliest days, recognized the necessity for her children to “chastise the body and bring it under subjection”, as St. Paul advises. The body is ever striving for mastery over the spirit; besides the external sources of temptation, “the world”, we have always another source with us which is a part of our nature. This is the reason for mortification. Self denial is in lawful things enables us to turn with great earnestness to spiritual things. It is on these grounds that the Ethiopian church has strictly adhered to the injunctions of the Didascalia and enjoyed on the faithful the longest and most austere fasts in the world. Fasting implies abstention from food and drink. Special days are appointed for fasting. Every Wednesday and Friday are days of fasting because on Wednesday the Jews held a council in which they rejected and condemned our Lord and on Friday they crucified him.]

The fasting of this particular, observance in the Tewahido Church-(Ethiopian Orthodox Christian Church) are ordained by the Fetha Nägäst–  , or plainly translated to English as the “Law of the Kings.”

{from ethiopianorthodox.org}

Now, in addition to the contributions of the Judeo-Christian, Ethiopian Orthodox-Tewahedo Church, we accredit this small excerpt from the Sage Journals:

"Traditionally, the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church (EOTC) holds that its canon of the Scriptures comprises eighty-one books of the Old and New Testaments. However, which books comprise this list remains obscure and the very little research executed so far on the topic is both insufficient and misleading..."

– YOU CAN FIND THE LINK TO THIS ARTICLE BELOW.

links about Fasika & Tinsa’e here @:

http://www.hebrew4christians.com/Holidays/Spring_Holidays/Unleavened_Bread/unleavened_bread.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fasika

http://www.dw.com/en/ethiopia-fasting-for-55-days/g-38067533

https://addisabram.wordpress.com/tag/tensae/

http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1889922_1890008_1889929,00.html

http://allafrica.com/stories/201504132413.html

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/2051677016651486

✡ Passover – פֶּסַח – Pesach ✡

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

Ras Tafari Renaissance writes to give perspective to the Hebraic remembrance of the Passover. In modern Judaism, it is known by the Hebrew term as Pesach – פֶּסַח. Jewish traditions celebrate the liberation from slavery in Egypt approx., 3,300 yrs ago by God; during the time of the Pharaohs, and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of. But, from the Ethiopian-Hebraic perspective, the liberation came from within a spiritual, socio-political, and religious viewpoints between Northern Egypt(Lower Egypt) & Southern Egypt(Upper Egypt).

Passover is considered apart of the Shalosh Regalim, or the main festivals of Israel’s commemoration to God. The day commences on the afternoon of the Hebraic, 14th of the month of Nisan.

[the Three Pilgrimage feast/festivals – Shalosh Regalim]

The narrative of the Exodus from the Scriptures, [Exo. 23: 15], gives the overlay of the children of Israel story in Rgypt.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passover

http://www.chabad.org/holidays/passover/pesach_cdo/aid/871715/jewish/What-Is-Passover.htm

http://www.jewfaq.org/holidaya.htm

Passover commemorates the story of the Exodus, in which the ancient Israelites were freed from slavery in Egypt. Passover begins on the 15th day of the month of Nisan in the Jewish calendar, which is in spring in the Northern Hemisphere, and is celebrated for seven or eight days. It is one of the most widely observed Jewish holidays.

 

The Israelites were instructed to mark the doorposts of their homes with the blood of a slaughtered spring lamb (“pascal lamb”) and, upon seeing this, the spirit of the Lord knew to pass-over the first-born in these homes, hence the English name of the holiday.

Selective readings for the Passover season are read throughout Hebraic households, communities, and congregations during this special time to keep a remembrance among these said communities for generations to come.

♔ Ethiopian Celebration of Christmas _ Genna/YeLidet Be’Al (ገና – የልደት በዓል) ♔

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

1506662_776236719097392_864806344977525299-copy

Ras Tafari Renaissance writes to give perspective to the Ethiopian holiday of Genna or otherwise called “YeLidet Be’al.”  Because of the calculations of the Ethiopic calendar, we find that the Christmas that is known in the Western world, using the Gregorian calendar doesn’t correspond with the Orthodox Christian churches’ calculations. (though they differ from specific church to church, within the Orthodoxy)  Instead of December 25th, or the twenty-fifth day of the 12th calendar month (Gregorian), we see that the date arrives on January 7th, or the seventh day of the 1st calendar month.

(Orthodox Christian teachings give this as a testimony for the celebration of the birth of Christ)

Christ presented in the Temple to Simeon (Luke 2: 25-26) painted by James J. Tissot

Christ presented in the Temple to Simeon (Luke 2: 25-26) artwork by James J. Tissot

During the first three centuries [A.D. – Anno Domini/After the Death of Christ], in the Churches of Jerusalem, Antioch, Alexandria and Cyprus, the Nativity of Christ was combined together with the Feast of His Baptism on January 6, and called “Theophany” (“Manifestation of God”).

 James Tissot's painting – The Magi Journeying (Les rois mages en voyage) – Brooklyn Museum

James Tissot’s painting – The Magi Journeying (Les rois mages en voyage) – Brooklyn Museum

This was because of a belief that Christ was baptized on the anniversary of His birth, which may be inferred from St. John Chrysostom’s sermon on the Nativity of Christ: “it is not the day on which Christ was born which is called Theophany, but rather that day on which He was baptized.”

[according to documentation from Orthodox Church of America]

http://oca.org/saints/lives/2014/12/25/103638-the-nativity-of-our-lord-god-and-savior-jesus-christ

star from the east - wise kings from the east (Star of Bethlehem)

By Ethiopic calculations, the birth of Christ, occurs on the Julian calendar‘s framework; predating the Gregorian.  In Eastern Christian (or Orthodox Christian sects) some, Orthodox Christians observe the “Nativity and Adoration of the Shepherds” on January 6th, & the following day may observe, the “Adoration of the Magi” (or otherwise known as the three kings/wise men) on January 7.  Other Orthodox Christians may attend church liturgies on the 6th, or both.

yelidet Qen (gena)

♔ Ethiopian Celebration of Christmas _ Genna/YeLidet Be’Al (ገና – የልደት በዓል) ♔

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

RRR - prototype (2015-16)

Ras Tafari Renaissance writes to give perspective to the Ethiopian holiday of Genna or otherwise called “YeLidet Be’al.”  Because of the calculations of the Ethiopic calendar, we find that the Christmas that is known in the Western world, using the Gregorian calendar doesn’t correspond with the Orthodox Christian churches’ calculations. (though they differ from specific church to church, within the Orthodoxy)  Instead of December 25th, or the twenty-fifth day of the 12th calendar month (Gregorian), we see that the date arrives on January 7th, or the seventh day of the 1st calendar month.

(Orthodox Christian teachings give this as a testimony for the celebration of the birth of Christ)

Christ presented in the Temple to Simeon (Luke 2: 25-26) painted by James J. Tissot

Christ presented in the Temple to Simeon (Luke 2: 25-26) artwork by James J. Tissot

During the first three centuries [A.D. – Anno Domini/After the Death of Christ], in the Churches of Jerusalem, Antioch, Alexandria and Cyprus, the Nativity of Christ was combined together with the Feast of His Baptism on January 6, and called “Theophany” (“Manifestation of God”).

 James Tissot's painting – The Magi Journeying (Les rois mages en voyage) – Brooklyn Museum

James Tissot’s painting – The Magi Journeying (Les rois mages en voyage) – Brooklyn Museum

This was because of a belief that Christ was baptized on the anniversary of His birth, which may be inferred from St. John Chrysostom’s sermon on the Nativity of Christ: “it is not the day on which Christ was born which is called Theophany, but rather that day on which He was baptized.”

[according to documentation from Orthodox Church of America]

http://oca.org/saints/lives/2014/12/25/103638-the-nativity-of-our-lord-god-and-savior-jesus-christ

star from the east - wise kings from the east (Star of Bethlehem)

By Ethiopic calculations, the birth of Christ, occurs on the Julian calendar‘s framework; predating the Gregorian.  In Eastern Christian (or Orthodox Christian sects) some, Orthodox Christians observe the “Nativity and Adoration of the Shepherds” on January 6th, & the following day may observe, the “Adoration of the Magi” (or otherwise known as the three kings/wise men) on January 7.  Other Orthodox Christians may attend church liturgies on the 6th, or both.

yelidet Qen (gena)

✡ Passover – פֶּסַח – Pesach ✡

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

 

432_417386508351927_1732265329_n

Ras Tafari Renaissance writes to give perspective to the Hebraic remembrance of the Passover.  In modern Judaism, it is known by the Hebrew term as Pesach-פֶּסַח.  Jewish traditions celebrate the liberation from slavery in Egypt approx., 3,300 yrs ago by God; during the time of the Pharaohs, and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of.  But, from the Ethiopian-Hebraic perspective, the liberation came from within a spiritual, socio-political,  and religious viewpoints between Northern Egypt(Lower Egypt) & Southern Egypt(Upper Egypt).

 

Passover is considered apart of the Shalosh Regalim, or the main festivals of Israel‘s commemoration to God.  The day commences on the afternoon of the Hebraic, 14th of the month of Nisan. [the Three Pilgrimage feast/festivals]

passover - pesach [readings 2015]

The narrative of the Exodus from the Scriptures, [Exo. 23: 15], gives the overlay of the children of Israel story in Rgypt.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passover

http://www.chabad.org/holidays/passover/pesach_cdo/aid/871715/jewish/What-Is-Passover.htm

http://www.jewfaq.org/holidaya.htm

 

Passover commemorates the story of the Exodus, in which the ancient Israelites were freed from slavery in Egypt. Passover begins on the 15th day of the month of Nisan in the Jewish calendar, which is in spring in the Northern Hemisphere, and is celebrated for seven or eight days. It is one of the most widely observed Jewish holidays.

The Israelites were instructed to mark the doorposts of their homes with the blood of a slaughtered spring lamb (“pascal lamb“) and, upon seeing this, the spirit of the Lord knew to pass-over the first-born in these homes, hence the English name of the holiday.

Passover_jpg

rastafari-get-chai-to-live