Tag Archives: miaphysite

♔ Eastern Churches Celebration of Christmas ♔

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

This is another one of the many interpretations of the Scriptures from the light of Ras Tafari by, I, Lidj Yefdi (pronounced Lij, Yef-dee).

I assure you that if you are patient with me, come with a willing mind and heart(ready to learn), you will receive more than what you might have asked for, in seeking the perspective of a Ras Tafarian’s I-sight [eyesight] if those who actually open up their Bibles to read in a Jewish/Hebrew cycle of readings, & thoroughly discern, have come to seek insight) into the study of the Scriptures.

Note, with this specific Sabbath; this year, on the same day marks what ones now are coining as the Orthodox Christmas celebration or for short

#ThreeKingsDay. Jan 6th-7th, 2018

Calculations:

  • [2018 AD] Anno-Domini (Western/Gregorian/Greenwich)
  • [5778 HC/JC] (Hebraic/Jewish)
  • [2010/7510 EC] (Tewahedo/Judeo-Christian)
  • [2018 JLC] (Julian) 

Adoration of the Maji – #ThreKingsDay

Ras Tafari Renaissance writes to give perspective to the Ethiopian holiday of Genna or otherwise called “YeLidet Be’al.”  Because of the calculations of the Ethiopic calendar, we find that the Christmas that is known in the Western world, using the Gregorian calendar doesn’t correspond with the Orthodox Christian churches’ calculations. (though they differ from specific church to church, within the Orthodoxy)  Instead of December 25th, or the twenty-fifth day of the 12th calendar month (Gregorian), we see that the date arrives on January 7th, or the seventh day of the 1st calendar month.

(Orthodox Christian teachings give this as a testimony for the celebration of the birth of Christ)

Christ presented in the Temple to Simeon (Luke 2: 25-26) painted by James J. Tissot

Christ presented in the Temple to Simeon (Luke 2: 25-26) artwork by James J. Tissot

During the first three centuries [A.D. – Anno Domini/commonly known as; After the Death of Christ], in the churches of Jerusalem, Antioch, Alexandria and Cyprus, the Nativity of Christ was combined together with the Feast of His Baptism on January 6, and called “Theophany” (“Manifestation of God”).

Byzantium (Constantinople) flourished and churches began to develop differently. East and West Europe split over religious differences between the Pope and Patriarch (Head of the EOCC) East-Eastern Orthodox Christian Church. West- Roman Catholic Church.

“Within many of the Eastern Churches, the celebrations of the events of the life of Jesus Christ as they are celebrated today were not instituted at the very beginning of the Christian era; they were held by the believers of the early Church as vivid commemorations without a connection with certain days and hymns, but as a real event of the Lord who was present in the Church.”

quoted from the Greek Orthodox Diocese of America Organization

https://www.goarch.org/-/the-feast-of-epiphany-the-feast-of-lights

 James Tissot's painting – The Magi Journeying (Les rois mages en voyage) – Brooklyn Museum

James Tissot’s painting – The Magi Journeying (Les rois mages en voyage) – Brooklyn Museum

This was because of a belief that Christ was baptized on the anniversary of His birth, which may be inferred from St. John Chrysostom’s sermon on the Nativity of Christ: “it is not the day on which Christ was born which is called Theophany, but rather that day on which He was baptized.”

[according to documentation from Orthodox Church of America]

http://oca.org/saints/lives/2014/12/25/103638-the-nativity-of-our-lord-god-and-savior-jesus-christ

star from the east - wise kings from the east (Star of Bethlehem)

By Ethiopic calculations, the birth of Christ, occurs on the Julian calendar‘s framework; predating the Gregorian.  In Eastern Christian (or Orthodox Christian sects) some, Orthodox Christians observe the “Nativity and Adoration of the Shepherds” on January 6th, & the following day may observe, the “Adoration of the Magi” (or otherwise known as the three kings/wise men) on January 7.  Other Orthodox Christians may attend church liturgies on the 6th, or both.

yelidet Qen (gena)

Abíy Tẓ’ōm – ዐቢይ ጾም / ዓቢይ ጾም _ Hūdădæ – ሑዳዴ (the Lenten Fast)

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

RRR - prototype (2015-16)

I welcome you all to another celebratory posting as we move closer to monumental commemoration of the Hebraic Passover.  This time is set for recollection and reexamination of one’s self.  Fasting & prayer is key leading up to the Passover.

Passover, commemorates the Hebrew Exodus out of Egypt during the bondage in which much of the original concepts of faith, culture and development were skewed in increments only noticeable to the people who had a immersed concept of the earlier testimonies of the origins.  Passover in the Hebraic sense is known as Pésăcḥ – פִּסֵחַ.  This Hebraic celebration is also known to be part of the Moedim – מועדים, or the “appointed times” set apart for the Hebrews/Israelites (Jews & those alike) to observe as memorials.  In the Ethiopic sense, Passover is known as Fasika – ፋሲካ.  In the way of the Hebrew/Jewish manners of faithful practices, the Ethiopians & Eritreans recognize this time of year in extremely similar patterns.  Though, there are applications in the greater in number churches, of the West; this still excludes them. (for example, the Roman Catholic, Baptist, Seven-day Adventist churches, Evangelical, etc.)  The Eastern Orthodox churches has observances that mirror those of what would be known as more, Hebraic or Jewish practices when pertaining to faith.

([YeAbiy Ts’om Minbabat : Zeymawoch’na Sibketoch]) = The Readings for the “Great Fast” : Times of the Teachings/Preachings/Sermons.

http://ethiopianorthodox.org/amharic/seasonal/lentprogram.html

Now, the to the reason for this post here at RasTafari Renaissance; is the “Great Fast,” or Abíy Tẓ’ōm – ዐቢይ ጾም / ዓቢይ ጾም.  This period in the Ethiopian & Eritrean Churches, which are also known as the “Tewahido/Tewahedo” churches clustered with the other Orthodox sister churches have similar practices which have orderly examples in which they observe this time leading up to Passover; known to the greater world as “Easter.”  You may know of this time especially in the West, that leads to Easter as “Lent” or the Lenten Fast.lent-hudade

To the Ethiopian & Eritrean Orthodox Churches, Lent (Hūdădæ – ሑዳዴ) means a period of fasting when the faithful undergo a rigorous schedule of prayers and penitence. This fast is observed with greater rigor than any other fast and it is a test of one’s Christianity.  One who fails to keep it is not considered a good Christian.  Properly observed it nullifies the sins committed during the rest of the year.  The faithful should abstain from all food except bread, water and salt.  It consists of about 56 days (opposite of the Western Christian – 40 days), all meat is forbidden, and also, what are called “lactina/lactose;” milk, butter, cheese, eggs, etc.

hebrew calendar - spring (Yamim Noraim) Holy Days

On all the fasting days only one meal is allowed and this is to be taken in the afternoon, or in the evening. On Saturdays and Sundays people are allowed to eat in the morning.  Daily Services are conducted in all the Churches.  Each day services are held from morning to the afternoon.  Priests regularly attend night services starting at midnight up to the early morning.
fasika5Each week of the Great Lent has its own name associated with what Christ did or taught. The names and the corresponding part of the bible are shown below with each Sunday heralding the beginning of each week.

http://www.eotc.faithweb.com/

[NOTE:]  Usually, small children of are excluded from these practices until the age of maturity has surfaced. (around pre-teen, or the teenage period)

Hudade(ሑዳዴ)-Lent [2]

https://ethnomed.org/calendar/abiy-tsom-lent-2016