Tag Archives: Jesus

♔ Ethio/Eritrean Tewahedo (ገና – የልደት በዓል) & Eastern Churches Celebration of Christmas ♔

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

Greetings, yet again to one and all, from “Lidj Yefdi” (pronounced Lij; Yêf-dee).

Note, with this specific Sabbath; this year, on the same day marks what ones now are coining as the Orthodox Christmas celebration or for short

#ThreeKingsDay. Jan 6th-7th, 2018

Calculations:

  • [2019 AD] Anno-Domini (Western/Gregorian/Greenwich)
  • [5779 HC/JC] (Hebraic/Jewish)
  • [2011/7511 EC] (Tewahedo/Judeo-Christian)
  • [2019 JLC] (Julian) 

Adoration of the Maji – #ThreKingsDay

Ras Tafari Renaissance writes to give perspective to the Ethiopian holiday of Genna or otherwise called “YeLidet Be’al.”  Because of the calculations of the Ethiopic calendar, we find that the Christmas that is known in the Western world, using the Gregorian calendar doesn’t correspond with the Orthodox Christian churches’ calculations. (though they differ from specific church to church, within the Orthodoxy)  Instead of December 25th, or the twenty-fifth day of the 12th calendar month (Gregorian), we see that the date arrives on January 7th, or the seventh day of the 1st calendar month.

(Orthodox Christian teachings give this as a testimony for the celebration of the birth of Christ)

Christ presented in the Temple to Simeon (Luke 2: 25-26) painted by James J. Tissot

Christ presented in the Temple to Simeon (Luke 2: 25-26) artwork by James J. Tissot

During the first three centuries [A.D. – Anno Domini/commonly known as; After the Death of Christ], in the churches of Jerusalem, Antioch, Alexandria and Cyprus, the Nativity of Christ was combined together with the Feast of His Baptism on January 6, and called “Theophany” (“Manifestation of God”).

Byzantium (Constantinople) flourished and churches began to develop differently. East and West Europe split over religious differences between the Pope and Patriarch (Head of the EOCC) East-Eastern Orthodox Christian Church. West- Roman Catholic Church.

“Within many of the Eastern Churches, the celebrations of the events of the life of Jesus Christ as they are celebrated today were not instituted at the very beginning of the Christian era; they were held by the believers of the early Church as vivid commemorations without a connection with certain days and hymns, but as a real event of the Lord who was present in the Church.”

quoted from the Greek Orthodox Diocese of America Organization

https://www.goarch.org/-/the-feast-of-epiphany-the-feast-of-lights

 James Tissot's painting – The Magi Journeying (Les rois mages en voyage) – Brooklyn Museum

James Tissot’s painting – The Magi Journeying (Les rois mages en voyage) – Brooklyn Museum

This was because of a belief that Christ was baptized on the anniversary of His birth, which may be inferred from St. John Chrysostom’s sermon on the Nativity of Christ: “it is not the day on which Christ was born which is called Theophany, but rather that day on which He was baptized.”

[according to documentation from Orthodox Church of America]

http://oca.org/saints/lives/2014/12/25/103638-the-nativity-of-our-lord-god-and-savior-jesus-christ

star from the east - wise kings from the east (Star of Bethlehem)

By Ethiopic calculations, the birth of Christ, occurs on the Julian calendar‘s framework; predating the Gregorian.  In Eastern Christian (or Orthodox Christian sects) some, Orthodox Christians observe the “Nativity and Adoration of the Shepherds” on January 6th, & the following day may observe, the “Adoration of the Magi” (or otherwise known as the three kings/wise men) on January 7.  Other Orthodox Christians may attend church liturgies on the 6th, or both.

yelidet Qen (gena)

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☩ Timk(Q)et – ጥምቀት በዓል – “Baptism” ☩

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

I welcome you all to again to Ras Tafari Renaissance Revelations, for the Ethiopic celebration of Timk(Q)et.  Timket, is the Ethiopian-Christian celebration in a symbolic manner of “Baptism” or “Epiphany.”  Today, Ethiopian/Eritrean Orthodox (Tewahedo/ Tewahido) Christians will be celebrating the feast of Timkat, deemed by some as the most important holiday for the Ethopian Orthodox faithful. TimQat usually begins on January 19th and is usually celebrated for three days.

timket qes

Celebrated on the 10th day of the (ወርኀ)month of T’ir (ጥር), it commemorates the Adoration of the Magi, who followed the Star of the East, & the Baptism of Christ.
In other references Epiphany, this specific celebration commemorated the wedding at Cana, also.

[see Mrk chpt.2;  Jhn chpt.2]

Epiphany-Timket-Festival-in-Addis-Ababa

In the Ethiopian Orthodox-Tewahedo Church, it is the most important festival in the year, seeing as how the Tabot – ታቦት, or the representation of the Ark of the Covenant is wrapped in priestly cloth and lead in procession for a reenactment of the Baptism of Christ, in the Jordan River.

timqet

Many Eastern Orthodox Christians have various celebrations, rites, an rituals for the feast day, as well. One of the most noticeable acts are sights, of priests processing through the prospective municipalities with replicas of the Ark of the Covenant.  This gesture is mores seen and been recorded in Erirtea/Ethiopia; symbolically reenacting the before Baptism of Christ at the Jordan.

 Russian icon of the Theophany (Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery, 1497).

Russian icon of the Theophany (Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery, 1497).

The Divine Liturgy is recited and celebrated near a stream or pool, early in the morning (approx 2 a.m., by the priesthood & some of the devout). Then the nearby body of water is blessed towards dawn, and sprinkled on the participants, some of whom enter the water and immerse themselves, as the old tradition carries; symbolically renewing their Baptismal vows.

timket4

Highlights of the festival are usually observed best at places such as:

  • the Castles of Gondar
  • the Spectacular scenery in the Simien Mountains
  • near Stelae in Axum
  • at the Rock-hewn churches of Lalibela

** FOR FURTHER STUDY** list links below:

http://ethiopianorthodox.org/amharic/seasonal/timket.html

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2014/jan/20/photography-ethiopia-timkat-festival-in-pictures

https://onbeing.org/blog/timkat-an-ethiopian-celebration-of-epiphany/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timkat

https://focusonthehorn.wordpress.com/2012/07/20/orthodox-modern-religion-politics-in-todays-ethiopia-part-1/

http://www.peace-on-earth.org/Ethiopia/1st.pdf

http://www.asmat.eu/scripts/article.php?Article=70-ethiopia-timkat-celebration-in-lalibela

http://www.selamtamagazine.com/stories/celebrating-timket

☩ Timk(Q)et – ጥምቀት በዓል – “Baptism” ☩

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

1506662_776236719097392_864806344977525299-copy

I welcome you all to again to Ras Tafari Renaissance Revelations, for the Ethiopic celebration of Timk(Q)et.  Timket, is the Ethiopian-Christian celebration in a symbolic manner of “Baptism” or “Epiphany.”  Today, Ethiopian Orthodox (Tewahedo/ Tewahido) Christians will be celebrating the feast of Timkat, the most important holiday for the Ethopian Orthodox faithful. TimQat begins on January 19th and is usually celebrated for three days.

timket qes

Celebrated on the 10th day of the (ወኀ)month of T’ir (ጥር), it commemorates the Adoration of the Magi, who followed the Star of the East, & the Baptism of Christ.
In other references Epiphany, could also be commemorated for the wedding at Cana, also.

[see Mrk chpt.2;  Jhn chpt.2]

Epiphany-Timket-Festival-in-Addis-Ababa

In the Ethiopian Orthodox-Tewahedo Church, it is the most important festival in the year, seeing as how the Tabot – ታቦት, or the representation of the Ark of the Covenant is wrapped in priestly cloth and lead in procession for a reenactment of the Baptism of Christ, in the Jordan River.

timqet

Many Eastern Orthodox Christians have various celebrations, rites, an rituals for the feast day, as well.

 Russian icon of the Theophany (Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery, 1497).

Russian icon of the Theophany (Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery, 1497).

timket4

** FOR FURTHER STUDY** list links below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timkat

https://focusonthehorn.wordpress.com/2012/07/20/orthodox-modern-religion-politics-in-todays-ethiopia-part-1/

http://www.peace-on-earth.org/Ethiopia/1st.pdf

http://www.asmat.eu/scripts/article.php?Article=70-ethiopia-timkat-celebration-in-lalibela

http://www.selamtamagazine.com/stories/celebrating-timket

♔ Ethiopian Celebration of Christmas _ Genna/YeLidet Be’Al (ገና – የልደት በዓል) ♔

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

1506662_776236719097392_864806344977525299-copy

Ras Tafari Renaissance writes to give perspective to the Ethiopian holiday of Genna or otherwise called “YeLidet Be’al.”  Because of the calculations of the Ethiopic calendar, we find that the Christmas that is known in the Western world, using the Gregorian calendar doesn’t correspond with the Orthodox Christian churches’ calculations. (though they differ from specific church to church, within the Orthodoxy)  Instead of December 25th, or the twenty-fifth day of the 12th calendar month (Gregorian), we see that the date arrives on January 7th, or the seventh day of the 1st calendar month.

(Orthodox Christian teachings give this as a testimony for the celebration of the birth of Christ)

Christ presented in the Temple to Simeon (Luke 2: 25-26) painted by James J. Tissot

Christ presented in the Temple to Simeon (Luke 2: 25-26) artwork by James J. Tissot

During the first three centuries [A.D. – Anno Domini/After the Death of Christ], in the Churches of Jerusalem, Antioch, Alexandria and Cyprus, the Nativity of Christ was combined together with the Feast of His Baptism on January 6, and called “Theophany” (“Manifestation of God”).

 James Tissot's painting – The Magi Journeying (Les rois mages en voyage) – Brooklyn Museum

James Tissot’s painting – The Magi Journeying (Les rois mages en voyage) – Brooklyn Museum

This was because of a belief that Christ was baptized on the anniversary of His birth, which may be inferred from St. John Chrysostom’s sermon on the Nativity of Christ: “it is not the day on which Christ was born which is called Theophany, but rather that day on which He was baptized.”

[according to documentation from Orthodox Church of America]

http://oca.org/saints/lives/2014/12/25/103638-the-nativity-of-our-lord-god-and-savior-jesus-christ

star from the east - wise kings from the east (Star of Bethlehem)

By Ethiopic calculations, the birth of Christ, occurs on the Julian calendar‘s framework; predating the Gregorian.  In Eastern Christian (or Orthodox Christian sects) some, Orthodox Christians observe the “Nativity and Adoration of the Shepherds” on January 6th, & the following day may observe, the “Adoration of the Magi” (or otherwise known as the three kings/wise men) on January 7.  Other Orthodox Christians may attend church liturgies on the 6th, or both.

yelidet Qen (gena)

☩ Fasika (ፋሲካ) ✡ Pesach [פֶּסַח] ☩

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

RRR - prototype (2015-16)

I welcome you all to yet another posting for the celebration of height of the Ethiopian-Hebrew (Judeo-Christian) season as we have reached another Passover!

This Passover, Lenten season is marked after the post-blood moon tetrad of 2014-15′ (Gregorian years) & brings forth many revelations of the continuance  and unfolding of prophecies from ancient times.  This season in the Hebrew year of 5776, Ethiopic years of 7508/2008, brings in the delayed Springtime with much happening in & around the world.

Passover_jpg

Ras Tafari Renaissance writes to give perspective to the Hebraic remembrance of the Passover.  In modern Judaism, it is known by the Hebrew term as Pesach – פֶּסַח.  Jewish traditions celebrate the liberation from slavery in Egypt approx., 3,300 yrs ago by God; during the time of the Pharaohs, and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of.  But, from the Ethiopian-Hebraic perspective, the liberation came from within a spiritual, socio-political,  and religious viewpoints between Northern Egypt(Lower Egypt) & Southern Egypt(Upper Egypt).

Passover is considered apart of the Shalosh Regalim, or the main festivals of Israel’s commemoration to God.  The day commences on the afternoon of the Hebraic, 14th of the month of Nisan.

passover - fasika readings 2016 (hebrew4christians.com)

The narrative of the Exodus from the Scriptures, [Exo. 23: 15], gives the overlay of the children of Israel story in Rgypt.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passover

http://www.chabad.org/holidays/passover/pesach_cdo/aid/871715/jewish/What-Is-Passover.htm

http://www.jewfaq.org/holidaya.htm

 

 

 

Likewise in the Ethiopic tradition, the celebration of Fasika,  in other circles of the Liturgical adherents to the Ethiopian Tewahido-Orthodox Church, the name for this observance, can also be called Be’âllä Tínsá’éy – በዓለ ትንሣኤ.  I refrain from using the Western Christendom adherance to the psuedo-equivalent, known as Easter; mainly because at the sheer core of the observance of Easter, stems from Greco-Roman Mythology(Eros, Easter Eggs, Easter Bunny, Greek Mythology etc.), and the origin of the celebration of Fasika, comes from the Hebraic Passover (Pesach/PesaKH’ – פֶּסַח) & Feast of Unleavened Bread (KH’ag/Chag Ha’Motz’ot – Chag ha-Matzot (in Hebrew)).

Sh'mura Matz'ot - Rabbinical supervised unleavened bread

Sh’mura Matz’ot – Rabbinical supervised unleavened bread

Ethiopian Injera - Unleavened Bread (Eaten Year-Round; not only on Fasika/Tinsa'e)

Ethiopian Injera – Unleavened Bread (Eaten Year-Round; not only on Fasika/Tinsa’e)

Fasika commemorates the Resurrection of CHRIST, though the exact day for celebration can be calculated from a perspective that is only slightly in contrast to the original calculation.  Through and through, Fasika assuredly gives a better foundation in the surreal conclusion that is the life of CHRIST.

Fasika22

Fasika is an extremely climatic celebration, like the Roman Catholic Church fasting season(often called “Lent“), but predating it by hundreds of years, the Ethiopian Tewahido-Orthodox Church adherents go into a fasting, and prayer period consisting of about approx., 40-to-56 days.  This important and soul-searching, period of time is known to the adherents as Hudade – ሑዳዴ, or Abiy’ Ts’ome – ዓቢይ ጾመ.

Hudade(ሑዳዴ)-Lent

[The Church, in her earliest days, recognized the necessity for her children to “chastise the body and bring it under subjection”, as St. Paul advises.  The body is ever striving for mastery over the spirit; besides the external sources of temptation, “the world”, we have always another source with us which is a part of our nature. This is the reason for mortification. Self denial is in lawful things enables us to turn with great earnestness to spiritual things. It is on these grounds that the Ethiopian church has strictly adhered to the injunctions of the Didascalia and enjoyed on the faithful the longest and most austere fasts in the world. Fasting implies abstention from food and drink. Special days are appointed for fasting. Every Wednesday and Friday are days of fasting because on Wednesday the Jews held a council in which they rejected and condemned our Lord and on Friday they crucified him.]

The fasting of this particular, observance in the Tewahido Church-(Ethiopian Orthodox Christian Church) are ordained by the Fetha Nägäst – or plainly translated to English as the “Law of the Kings.”

fetha nagast (law of the kings)

{from ethiopianorthodox.org}

Fasika11

http://www.hebrew4christians.com/Holidays/Spring_Holidays/Unleavened_Bread/unleavened_bread.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fasika

♔ Ethiopian Celebration of Christmas _ Genna/YeLidet Be’Al (ገና – የልደት በዓል) ♔

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

RRR - prototype (2015-16)

Ras Tafari Renaissance writes to give perspective to the Ethiopian holiday of Genna or otherwise called “YeLidet Be’al.”  Because of the calculations of the Ethiopic calendar, we find that the Christmas that is known in the Western world, using the Gregorian calendar doesn’t correspond with the Orthodox Christian churches’ calculations. (though they differ from specific church to church, within the Orthodoxy)  Instead of December 25th, or the twenty-fifth day of the 12th calendar month (Gregorian), we see that the date arrives on January 7th, or the seventh day of the 1st calendar month.

(Orthodox Christian teachings give this as a testimony for the celebration of the birth of Christ)

Christ presented in the Temple to Simeon (Luke 2: 25-26) painted by James J. Tissot

Christ presented in the Temple to Simeon (Luke 2: 25-26) artwork by James J. Tissot

During the first three centuries [A.D. – Anno Domini/After the Death of Christ], in the Churches of Jerusalem, Antioch, Alexandria and Cyprus, the Nativity of Christ was combined together with the Feast of His Baptism on January 6, and called “Theophany” (“Manifestation of God”).

 James Tissot's painting – The Magi Journeying (Les rois mages en voyage) – Brooklyn Museum

James Tissot’s painting – The Magi Journeying (Les rois mages en voyage) – Brooklyn Museum

This was because of a belief that Christ was baptized on the anniversary of His birth, which may be inferred from St. John Chrysostom’s sermon on the Nativity of Christ: “it is not the day on which Christ was born which is called Theophany, but rather that day on which He was baptized.”

[according to documentation from Orthodox Church of America]

http://oca.org/saints/lives/2014/12/25/103638-the-nativity-of-our-lord-god-and-savior-jesus-christ

star from the east - wise kings from the east (Star of Bethlehem)

By Ethiopic calculations, the birth of Christ, occurs on the Julian calendar‘s framework; predating the Gregorian.  In Eastern Christian (or Orthodox Christian sects) some, Orthodox Christians observe the “Nativity and Adoration of the Shepherds” on January 6th, & the following day may observe, the “Adoration of the Magi” (or otherwise known as the three kings/wise men) on January 7.  Other Orthodox Christians may attend church liturgies on the 6th, or both.

yelidet Qen (gena)

☩ Fasika – ፋሲካ _ Tins(h)a’e – ትንሣኤ – “Resurrection” ☩

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

 

432_417386508351927_1732265329_n

Ras Tafari Renaissance writes to give perspective to the Ethiopic Tewahido-Orthodox, celebration of Fasika.  In other circles of the Liturgical adherents to the Ethiopian Tewahido-Orthodox Church, the name for this observance, can also be called Be’al Tinsa’e-በዓል ትንሣኤ.  I refrain from using the Western Christendom adherances to the psuedo-equivalent, known as Easter; mainly because at the sheer core of the observance of Easter, stems from Greco-Roman Mythology(Eros, Easter Eggs, Easter Bunny, Greek Mythology etc.), and the origin of the celebration of Fasika, comes from the Hebraic, Passover(Pesach/PesaKH’-פֶּסַח) & Feast of Unleavened Bread (KH’ag/Chag Ha’Motz’ot-Chag ha-Matzot (in Hebrew)).

Sh'mura Matz'ot - Rabbinical supervised unleavened bread

Sh’mura Matz’ot – Rabbinical supervised unleavened bread

 

- Ethiopian baked bread (Injera)

– Ethiopian baked bread (Injera)

 

Fasika commemorates the Resurrection of CHRIST, though the exact day for celebration can be calculated from a perspective that is only slightly in contrast to the original calculation.  Through and through, Fasika assuredly gives a better foundation in the surreal conclusion that is the life of CHRIST.

resurrection

Fasika is an extremely climatic celebration, like the Roman Catholic Church fasting season(often called “Lent“), but predating it by hundreds of years, the Ethiopian Tewahido-Orthodox Church adherents go into a fasting, and prayer period consisting of about approx., 40-to-56 days.  This important and soul-searching, period of time is known to the adherents as Hudade-ሑዳዴ, or Abiy’ Ts’ome-ዓቢይ ጾመ.

Hudade(ሑዳዴ)-Lent

The Church, in her earliest days, recognized the necessity for her children to “chastise the body and bring it under subjection”, as St. Paul advises.  The body is ever striving for mastery over the spirit; besides the external sources of temptation, “the world”, we have always another source with us which is a part of our nature. This is the reason for mortificationSelf denial is in lawful things enables us to turn with great earnestness to spiritual things.  It is on these grounds that the Ethiopian church has strictly adhered to the injunctions of the Didascalia and enjoyed upon the faithful, the longest and most austere fasts in the world.  Fasting implies abstention from food and drink, in one sense of understanding. Special days are appointed for fasting.

The Ethiopic Version Of The Apostolical Constitutions; Or, The Ethiopic Didascalia, Received In The Church Of Abyssinia [Ethiopia] by Thomas Pell 1796-1852 Platt (click book cover to purchase or link below to inquire about availability)

The Ethiopic Version Of The Apostolical Constitutions; Or, The Ethiopic Didascalia, Received In The Church Of Abyssinia [Ethiopia] by Thomas Pell 1796-1852 Platt (click book cover to purchase or link below to inquire about availability)

Every Wednesday and Friday, are days of fasting because on Wednesday the Jews held a council in which they rejected and condemned our Lord (Jesus/Iyesus) and on Friday they crucified him;  according the Christian theology.

ETHIOPIC DIDASCALIA, The Apostolic Constitutions & Ethiopic Church Orders; As Translated by J.M. Harden

ETHIOPIC DIDASCALIA, The Apostolic Constitutions & Ethiopic Church Orders; As Translated by J.M. Harden (click book cover to purchase or link below to inquire on availability)

http://www.lojsociety.org/books.html

The fasting of this particular, observance in the Tewahido Church – (Ethiopian Orthodox Christian Church) are ordained by the Fät’há Nägäst – or plainly translated to English as the “Law of the Kings.”

fetha nagast (law of the kings)

During “Lent” (Hudade/Abiy Ts’om) in Ethiopia, Christians don’t eat or buy any animal products like meat, eggs, butter, milk, yogurt, cream and cheese.

painting of CHRIST riding into Jerusalem being greeted the Israelites; see Matt. 21:1-16

painting of CHRIST riding into Jerusalem being greeted the Israelites; see Matt. 21:1-16

On Palm Sunday, people wear head bands and rings made of palm leaves with crosses marked on them.

rtg.lojs palm sunday artwork

The first  Easter Day (Fasika/Tinsa’e) service actually starts at 8.00pm on Easter Saturday night and lasts until 3.00 am on “Easter” Sunday  (Resurrection Sunday) morning! Most people go to the whole service and wear their best clothes. These are often white and are called ‘YeAbesha Libs‘ in the modern time of today more originally “YeEtyopiayawiyan Libs“.  People have candles made of cotton and wax called ‘twaf‘.  At 10.00 pm drummers start playing and accompanying the Priests as they chant a prayer called the ‘Geez‘. (or the Ancient Ethiopic language)

http://www.whyeaster.com/cultures/ethiopia.shtml

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fasika

{from ethiopianorthodox.org}

Fasika11

 

http://www.hebrew4christians.com/Holidays/Spring_Holidays/Unleavened_Bread/unleavened_bread.html