Tag Archives: 5778 HC

✡ Feast of Unleavened Bread – የቂጣውን በዓል – חג המצות ✡

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

This is another one of the many interpretations of the Scriptures from the light of Ras Tafari by, I, Lidj Yefdi (pronounced Lij, Yef-dee).

Though there has been much ground to cover, as far as, all of the occurrences, events, memorials, etc.;

Ras Tafari Renaissance writes to give perspective to the Hebraic remembrance of the Passover.  In modern Judaism, it is known by the Hebrew term as Pesach – פֶּסַח.  Jewish traditions celebrate the liberation from slavery in Egypt approx., 3,300 yrs ago by God; during the time of the Pharaohs, and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of.  But, from the Ethiopian-Hebraic perspective, the liberation came from within a spiritual, socio-political,  and religious viewpoints between Northern Egypt(Lower Egypt) & Southern Egypt(Upper Egypt).

Now as the celebration of Pesach has come to a close for this year and the festival/feast of Unleavened Bread has begun, we here at RRR, seek to expound on the intricate details of the second celebration which extends the joyous event of Pesach;

the Feast of Unleavened Bread-የቂጣውን በዓል – חג המצות.

- Ethiopian baked bread (Injera)

During the initiation of the Passover, the last plague (10th/tenth) placed upon the Egyptians and the Land of Egypt, the children of Israel the next morning were unable to fully prepare for the journey they were about to take through the wilderness; for they were thrust out Egypt for Pharaoh wanted nothing more to do with the Hebrews for the power of God of Abraham, Isaac, & Jacob had proven omnipotent.

[Exod. 11:29-33]

The Egyptians were urgent on getting the children of Israel, to leave the land of Egypt after the angel of death, sent by the God of the Hebrews to plague Egypt, of the all the firstborn of the land.

So, the Israelites took what they could of their own belongings, and the Egyptians lent to them what they didn’t have for fear of any plagues.  But, when it came to the food that the children of Israel sought to take with them, the bread they had baked was without leaven so the dough had no time to rise for they sought to leave Egypt abruptly.

Israel leaving Egypt _ painting by Tissot

While, in route through the wilderness the children of Israel ate unleavened bread, until there was no more bread at all; as they did for the institution of thePassover Seder.

[Exod. 12:15 ; vrs. 33-51]

LINKS: 

http://lojsociety.org/books

https://rastafarirenaissance.com/tag/feast-of-unleavened-bread/

http://www.hebrew4christians.com/Holidays/Spring_Holidays/Unleavened_Bread/Anavah/anavah.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passover

https://www.sefaria.org/Exodus.12.23?lang=bi&with=Onkelos%20Exodus&lang2=bi

Advertisements

✤ TINS(h)A’E _ ትንሣኤ _ “RESURRECTION” ✤

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

This is another one of the many interpretations of the Scriptures from the light of Ras Tafari by, I, Lidj Yefdi (pronounced Lij, Yef-dee).

Though there has been much ground to cover, as far as, all of the occurrences, events, memorials, etc.;

Ras Tafari Renaissance writes to give perspective to the Ethiopic Tewahido-Orthodox, celebration of Fasika.  In other circles of the Liturgical adherents to the Ethiopian Tewahido-Orthodox Church, the name for this observance, can also be called Be’ale Tinsa’e – በዓለ ትንሣኤ.  I refrain from using the Western Christendom adherance to the psuedo-equivalent, known as Easter; mainly because at the sheer core of the observance of Easter, stems from Greco-Roman Mythology(Eros, Easter Eggs, Easter Bunny, Greek Mythology etc.), and the origin of the celebration of Fasika, comes from the Hebraic Passover(Pesach/PesaKH’-פֶּסַח) & Feast of Unleavened Bread(KH’ag/Chag Ha’Motz’ot-Chag ha-Matzot (in Hebrew)).

Sh'mura Matz'ot - Rabbinical supervised unleavened bread
Sh’mura Matz’ot – Rabbinical supervised unleavened bread

 

Ethiopian Injera - Unleavened Bread (Eaten Year-Round; not only on Fasika/Tinsa'e)
Ethiopian Injera – Unleavened Bread (Eaten Year-Round; not only on Fasika/Tinsa’e)

 

Fasika commemorates the Resurrection of CHRIST, though the exact day for celebration can be calculated from a perspective that is only slightly in contrast to the original calculation.  Through and through, Fasika assuredly gives a better foundation in the surreal conclusion that is the life of CHRIST.

Fasika is an extremely climatic celebration, like the Roman Catholic Church fasting season (often called “Lent“), but predating it by hundreds of years, the Ethiopian Tewahido-Orthodox Church adherents go into a fasting, and prayer period consisting of about approx., 40-to-56 days.  This important and soul-searching, period of time is known to the adherents as Hudade-ሑዳዴ, or Abiy’ Ts’ome-ዓቢይ ጾመ.

Hudade(ሑዳዴ)-Lent

[The Church, in her earliest days, recognized the necessity for her children to “chastise the body and bring it under subjection”, as St. Paul advises.  The body is ever striving for mastery over the spirit; besides the external sources of temptation, “the world”, we have always another source with us which is a part of our nature. This is the reason for mortification. Self denial is in lawful things enables us to turn with great earnestness to spiritual things. It is on these grounds that the Ethiopian church has strictly adhered to the injunctions of the Didascalia and enjoyed on the faithful the longest and most austere fasts in the world. Fasting implies abstention from food and drink. Special days are appointed for fasting. Every Wednesday and Friday are days of fasting because on Wednesday the Jews held a council in which they rejected and condemned our Lord and on Friday they crucified him.]

The fasting of this particular, observance in the Tewahido Church-(Ethiopian Orthodox Christian Church) are ordained by the Fetha Nägäst-or plainly translated to English as the “Law of the Kings.”

fetha nagast (law of the kings)

{from ethiopianorthodox.org}

 

LINKS:

http://www.hebrew4christians.com/Holidays/Spring_Holidays/Unleavened_Bread/unleavened_bread.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fasika

✡ Feast of Unleavened Bread – የቂጣውን በዓል – חג המצות ✡

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

This is another one of the many interpretations of the Scriptures from the light of Ras Tafari by, I, Lidj Yefdi (pronounced Lij, Yef-dee).

Though there has been much ground to cover, as far as, all of the occurrences, events, memorials, etc.;

Ras Tafari Renaissance writes to give perspective to the Hebraic remembrance of the Passover.  In modern Judaism, it is known by the Hebrew term as Pesach – פֶּסַח.  Jewish traditions celebrate the liberation from slavery in Egypt approx., 3,300 yrs ago by God; during the time of the Pharaohs, and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of.  But, from the Ethiopian-Hebraic perspective, the liberation came from within a spiritual, socio-political,  and religious viewpoints between Northern Egypt(Lower Egypt) & Southern Egypt(Upper Egypt).

Now as the celebration of Pesach has come to a close for this year and the festival/feast of Unleavened Bread has begun, we here at RRR, seek to expound on the intricate details of the second celebration which extends the joyous event of Pesach;

the Feast of Unleavened Bread-የቂጣውን በዓል – חג המצות.

- Ethiopian baked bread (Injera)

During the initiation of the Passover, the last plague (10th/tenth) placed upon the Egyptians and the Land of Egypt, the children of Israel the next morning were unable to fully prepare for the journey they were about to take through the wilderness; for they were thrust out Egypt for Pharaoh wanted nothing more to do with the Hebrews for the power of God of Abraham, Isaac, & Jacob had proven omnipotent.

[Exod. 11:29-33]

The Egyptians were urgent on getting the children of Israel, to leave the land of Egypt after the angel of death, sent by the God of the Hebrews to plague Egypt, of the all the firstborn of the land.

So, the Israelites took what they could of their own belongings, and the Egyptians lent to them what they didn’t have for fear of any plagues.  But, when it came to the food that the children of Israel sought to take with them, the bread they had baked was without leaven so the dough had no time to rise for they sought to leave Egypt abruptly.

Israel leaving Egypt _ painting by Tissot

While, in route through the wilderness the children of Israel ate unleavened bread, until there was no more bread at all; as they did for the institution of thePassover Seder.

[Exod. 12:15 ; vrs. 33-51]

LINKS: 

http://lojsociety.org/books

https://rastafarirenaissance.com/tag/feast-of-unleavened-bread/

http://www.hebrew4christians.com/Holidays/Spring_Holidays/Unleavened_Bread/Anavah/anavah.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passover

https://www.sefaria.org/Exodus.12.23?lang=bi&with=Onkelos%20Exodus&lang2=bi

☩ Timk(Q)et – ጥምቀት በዓል – “Baptism” ☩

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

I welcome you all to again to Ras Tafari Renaissance Revelations, for the Ethiopic celebration of Timk(Q)et.  Timket, is the Ethiopian-Christian celebration in a symbolic manner of “Baptism” or “Epiphany.”  Today, Ethiopian/Eritrean Orthodox (Tewahedo/ Tewahido) Christians will be celebrating the feast of Timkat, deemed by some as the most important holiday for the Ethopian Orthodox faithful. TimQat usually begins on January 19th and is usually celebrated for three days.

timket qes

Celebrated on the 10th day of the (ወርኀ)month of T’ir (ጥር), it commemorates the Adoration of the Magi, who followed the Star of the East, & the Baptism of Christ.
In other references Epiphany, this specific celebration commemorated the wedding at Cana, also.

[see Mrk chpt.2;  Jhn chpt.2]

Epiphany-Timket-Festival-in-Addis-Ababa

In the Ethiopian Orthodox-Tewahedo Church, it is the most important festival in the year, seeing as how the Tabot – ታቦት, or the representation of the Ark of the Covenant is wrapped in priestly cloth and lead in procession for a reenactment of the Baptism of Christ, in the Jordan River.

timqet

Many Eastern Orthodox Christians have various celebrations, rites, an rituals for the feast day, as well. One of the most noticeable acts are sights, of priests processing through the prospective municipalities with replicas of the Ark of the Covenant.  This gesture is mores seen and been recorded in Erirtea/Ethiopia; symbolically reenacting the before Baptism of Christ at the Jordan.

 Russian icon of the Theophany (Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery, 1497).

Russian icon of the Theophany (Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery, 1497).

The Divine Liturgy is recited and celebrated near a stream or pool, early in the morning (approx 2 a.m., by the priesthood & some of the devout). Then the nearby body of water is blessed towards dawn, and sprinkled on the participants, some of whom enter the water and immerse themselves, as the old tradition carries; symbolically renewing their Baptismal vows.

timket4

Highlights of the festival are usually observed best at places such as:

  • the Castles of Gondar
  • the Spectacular scenery in the Simien Mountains
  • near Stelae in Axum
  • at the Rock-hewn churches of Lalibela

** FOR FURTHER STUDY** list links below:

http://ethiopianorthodox.org/amharic/seasonal/timket.html

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2014/jan/20/photography-ethiopia-timkat-festival-in-pictures

https://onbeing.org/blog/timkat-an-ethiopian-celebration-of-epiphany/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timkat

https://focusonthehorn.wordpress.com/2012/07/20/orthodox-modern-religion-politics-in-todays-ethiopia-part-1/

http://www.peace-on-earth.org/Ethiopia/1st.pdf

http://www.asmat.eu/scripts/article.php?Article=70-ethiopia-timkat-celebration-in-lalibela

http://www.selamtamagazine.com/stories/celebrating-timket

✡ Shemini Atz’eret (שמיני עצרת) “The 8th Day of Assembly” ✤ BeS’mintegnawm Q’en (በስምንትኛውም ቀን) ✡

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

I welcome you all to yet another posting in one of the many interpretations of the Scriptures from the light of Ras Tafari by, I, Lidj Yefdi (pronounced Lij, Yef-dee).

This is Lidj Yefdi, here at Ras Tafari Renaissance Revelations, hoping all of you are in good health: mind, body & spirit; & if you just happen to be on the downside of your particular scenario, I, personally hope, wish & pray that you be given, as well as, you receive, the strength which is needed to overcome the specific situation.

As we have completed a cycle of Torah reading/studies, we as Hebrew people, as well as they who choose to assemble again, to commemorate the Hebraic memorial of Sukkot.  As Succoth, is an “Ingathering” for faithful Hebrews, this assembly on the eighth day of a seven day festival renders a Sabbath of completion of Torah readings and Hebrew Year. (also gathering of the harvest)

shemini atzeret

Some may include, Shemini Atz’eret with the days of Sukkot or regard them as one, but this is not the case.  Shemini At’zeret was to be a sloemn assembly of its own.

Some Sukkot observances carry over into Shemini At’zeret; seeing as it is the closing the Sukkot memorial.  Readings, from the Torah & Nebi’im, along with services in most synagogues/temples of Hebraic peoples are read, where a Prayer/Psalm for Rain [Tefillat Gesham], for the year ahead, (for the crops, that were to be grown) may be recited.

Hebrew-Feasts

NOTES:

Genesis 48: 16

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shemini_Atzeret

Leviticus 23: 33-43

https://www.hebcal.com/holidays/shmini-atzeret

Numbers 29: 35-30:1

http://www.hebrew4christians.com/Holidays/Fall_Holidays/Shemini_Atzeret/shemini_atzeret.html

Psalms 27

Deuteronomy 29: 35

✡ Succoth (סֻכּוֹת) ✤ Das Be’al (ዳስ በዓል) ✡

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

I welcome you all to yet another posting in one of the many interpretations of the Scriptures from the light of Ras Tafari by, I, Lidj Yefdi (pronounced Lij, Yef-dee).


Again, this is Lidj Yefdi, wishing everyone a very blessed Sukkot!  Other names for this High Holy Day or appointed time as translated from the Hebrew language comes to us as; the “Feast of Booths,” the “Tabernacles/Festival of Tabernacles,” or as the “Ingathering.”

sukkot4

The Festival of Sukkot begins on the 15th, of the Hebrew month of Tishrei & is observed for seven days. (five days after Yom Kippur)  Sukkot, is in many ways very opposite to the observance of Yom Kippur, especially as ones would know and find it among peoples of today.  One reason in saying this is that Sukkot is very joyful and it is commonly referred to in modern day Jewish prayer and literature as Z’man Símcḥatéinu זמן שמחתינו; more literally translated to the English language as: “The Season of Our Rejoicing.”  Now in a similar fashion of the celebration of Passover and Shabuot, Sukkot has a significance that is doubled in a sense, especially when pertaining to its historical and agricultural perspectives.

Mirrors of Hamo-Shemitic culture: Ethiopian Tekuloch in the country side (resemblances of the succahs)

Mirrors of Hamo-Shemitic culture: Ethiopia in the country side (resemblances of the Succah)

In a historical manner, the celebration of Sukkot commemorates the (40) forty-year period during which the children of Israel were wandering in the wilderness, living in temporary shelters.  Hence, for the term “Feast or Festival of Tabernacles,” in the similar way the Tabernacle/Tent of Meeting and encampment of the children of Israel was constructed while making the Exodus with the significant role of the furnishings playing their respective parts.  Agriculturally, Sukkot is a harvest festival and is sometimes referred to as Chag Ha’Asífחג האסף, translating to the “Festival of Ingathering.”

[Lev. 23: 34- ; Deut. 16: 13-15]

hebrew-calendar-months-and-feast-cycle

Sukkot is the third and the culmination of the Shalosh Regalim, or commonly known as the “Three Pilgrimage Festivals of Israel.”

Shalosh Regalim- Three Pilgrimage Festivals; in which an emphasis on men of the Hebrew lineage were to make for the God of Israel.

Shalosh Regalim– Three Pilgrimage Festivals; in which an emphasis on men of the Hebrew lineage were to make for the God of Israel.

Sukkot is a very joyous festival/feast day, & there are various ways of maintaining observances.  In the final of day of the memorial of Sukkot, the day is referred to as HoShanna Rabbah, which is a special observance with the use of bundling willow branches.

Sukkot_4 Species

Sukkot_4 Species

Sukkot, in summation is the children of Israel residing in a temporary state, resembling & calling to remembrance the time in the wilderness post-Exodus but, pre-entering into the Land of Promise.

STUDY NOTES:

Leviticus 23: 33-36

Deuteronomy 16: 13-16

http://www.mechon-mamre.org/jewfaq/holiday5.htm

http://www.jewfaq.org/holiday5.htm

http://www.hebrew4christians.com/Holidays/Fall_Holidays/Sukkot/sukkot.html

☩ MesQel (መስቀል) The Finding of the True Cross ☩

Greetings in the name of His & Her Imperial Majesties Qedamawi Haile Sellassie I & Itege Menen Asfaw,

I welcome you all to a new regeneration of cycle Torah readings!  This is another one of the many interpretations of the Scriptures from the light of Ras Tafari by, I, Lidj Yefdi (pronounced Lij, Yef-dee).

Ras Tafari Renaissance Revelations is here wishing you all a VERY HAPPY ETHIOPIAN EPIPHANY/MESQEL!!!

This celebration is attributed to the Ethiopian account of the “Finding of the True Cross.”  The celebration of MäsQäl is observed on the 17th day of the Ethiopian month of Meskerem.


The legend speaks of Queen Eleni finding the cross by a revelation with the use of a bonfire, in the 4th century AD, (about the time Ethiopia, officially became the first Christian nation).

[other legend has it account with Queen Helena of Constantinople]

mesqelu-3

The fire that was lit would lead to the Cross, so the Queen ordered the people of Jerusalem to bring wood for a large pile.  In Ethiopia, the custom of the bonfire, once completed the ashes from the bonfire are used for the Passion Week’s Ash Wednesday.

mesQel8

The fire, by which way it leads (N,S,E, or W) can sometimes, by tradition predict what kind of year will be to come.

[good or bad]

mesQel beAl4

During the celebration, there is singing, chanting, and many beautiful colors all around.  MesQel is always to take place after the Ethiopian New Year, a seasonal holiday after the rains, for the coming of the Sun.

MesQel9

The celebration of MesQel, is also known as the Exaltation of the True Cross.  Now, in another peculiar manner in which has become so synonymous with the operations of postings and quite clearly the overall thinking here at Ras Tafari Renaissance, along with many of our affiliates; we relay to you once again, that another Ethiopian commemoration has a correspondence with another Hebrew, or what the world knows as Jewish observance.

mesQelu

The Hebrew observance that corresponds with this celebration of Meskel, or the Finding/Exaltation of the True Cross is Yom Kíppūr – יוֹם כִּיפּוּר.  In a incidence and coincidental pattern the Ethiopian & Hebraic/Jewish New Year meet in the beginning days of the fall season. (Sept/Oct) In a repetitive fashion, MesQel; the Finding of the true Cross foreshadows Yom Kíppūr; otherwise known as the Day of Atonement.  These two memorials show again the historical references we allude to in many findings of our own.  This also leaves much more room for expansion on these specific topics, which we in turn will surely do in the coming updates. All in all,…

Ras Tafari Renaissance Revelations again, wishes ALL a joyful Epiphany!!!

NOTES:

Exodus 40: 30-38

– Legendary difference between the account of Queen(Nigist) Eleni’s “Finding of the True Cross” & the Byzantine Queen Helena’s “Finding of the True Cross”